Mīān Muhammad Bakhsh (Punjabi: میاں محمد بخش)

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Mīān Muhammad Bakhsh (Punjabi: میاں محمد بخش)

was a Sufi holy person and a Pahari-Pothwari Hindko and Panjistani artist viewed as the Rumi of Hind Indian subcontinent. He had a place with the Qadri tariqah. He is particularly eminent as the writer of a book of verse called Sayful Mulūk just as the sentiment disaster Mirza Sahiban. He was conceived in a town called Khari Sharif, arranged close Mirpur.[2]

Mīān Muhammad Bakhsh (Punjabi: میاں محمد بخش) was a Sufi
Mīān Muhammad Bakhsh (Punjabi: میاں محمد بخش) was a Sufi

Lineage

Mīān Muhammad Bakhsh (Punjabi: میاں محمد بخش) was a Sufi
He was a fourth era profound relative of Damriyan Wali Sarkar, who is covered in Khari Sharif. Damriyan Wali Sarkar’s khalīfah was Dīn Muhammad; and his khalīfah was Mīān Shamsuddīn, who had three children: Mīān Bahāval Bakhsh, Mīān Muhammad Bakhsh and Mīān ‘Alī Bakhsh. Mīān Muhammad Bakhsh’s predecessors were of Gujjar (Paswal) birthplace, had settled in the Mirpur District of Azad Jammu and Kashmir.[3]

About date of birth

1

Mīān Muhammad Bakhsh (Punjabi: میاں محمد بخش)
There is significant difference about his time of birth. Mahbūb ‘Alī Faqīr Qādirī, in a life story printed as an informative supplement to the content of Sayful Mulūk gives the date as 1246 AH (1830 AD), a date likewise followed by the Shāhkār Islāmī Encyclopedia; 1830 and 1843 are recommended in different works. Mīān Muhammad Bakhsh himself states in his artful culmination, Sayful Mulūk, that he finished the work in the long stretch of Ramadan, 1279 AH (1863 AD), and that he was then thirty-three years old. Consequently, he probably been conceived in 1829 or 1830.[1]
As indicated by certain individuals, his family had a place with a town Bazurgwal in North of Gujrat District, Punjab, Pakistan, and later relocated to an acclaimed holy person’s town Khari Sharif, 10 km South of present city of Mirpur, Azad Kashmir.
He was raised in a strict domain, and got his initial training at home. He was later sent with his senior sibling, Mīān Bahāval, to the close by town of Samwal Sharīf to consider strict sciences, particularly the study of Hadith in the madrassah of Hāfiz Muhammad ‘Alī. His instructor was Hāfiz Ghulam Hussain. Hāfiz Muhammad ‘Alī had a sibling, Hāfiz Nāsir, who was a majzub, and had denied common issues; this dervish dwelled around then in the mosque at Samwal Sharīf. From adolescence Mīān Muhammad had shown a propensity for verse, and was particularly attached to perusing Yūsuf ō Zulaikhā by Nur advertisement Din Abd ar-Rahman Jami. During his time at the madrassah, Hāfiz Nāsir would regularly implore him to sing a few lines from Jami’s verse, and after hearing it so expertly rendered would perpetually fall into a condition of otherworldly inebriation.

Mīān Muhammad Bakhsh (Punjabi: میاں محمد بخش)

Mīān Muhammad was still just fifteen years of age when his dad, falling truly sick, and understanding that he was on his deathbed, called every one of his understudies and neighborhood public accountants to see him. Mīān Shamsuddīn told his guests that it was his obligation to pass on the profound genealogy that he had gotten through his family from Pīr-e Shāh Ghāzī Qalandar Damriyan Wali Sarkar; he highlighted his own child, Mīān Muhammad, and told those collected that he could discover no one more reasonable than he to whom he may grant this benefit. Everyone concurred, the youngster’s notoriety had just spread far and wide. Mīān Muhammad, be that as it may, shouted out and deviated, saying that he was unable to stand to hold on and permit his senior sibling Bahāvul to be denied of the respect. The elderly person was loaded up with such a great amount of adoration for his child that he stood up and leaving his bed got a handle on his child by the arms; he drove him to one corner and made him face the surmised heading of Baghdad, and afterward he tended to the organizer of their Sufi Order, Shaikh Abdul Qadir Gilani, introducing his child to him as his otherworldly replacement. Soon after this occurrence his dad passed on. Mīān Muhammad kept on living in his family home for a further four years, at that point at nineteen years old he moved into the khānqāh, where he stayed for an amazing remainder. The two his siblings joined both religion and common undertakings in their lives, yet he was just inspired by otherworldliness, and never wedded – in contrast to them

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